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Pope Benedict XVI on Lenten Fasting

Yesterday’s feast of Candlemas marks the last day of the liturgical year that looks back toward the Nativity. Now we look forward to Easter. Lent begins on February 25. It is time to think about how you will spend your Lent. I wrote here about spiritual growth through reading. Pope Benedict XVI asks to also focus on fasting this Lent. Please read his 2009 Lenten message.

In our own day, fasting seems to have lost something of its spiritual meaning, and has taken on, in a culture characterized by the search for material well-being, a therapeutic value for the care of one’s body. Fasting certainly bring benefits to physical well-being, but for believers, it is, in the first place, a "therapy" to heal all that prevents them from conformity to the will of God. In the Apostolic Constitution Pænitemini of 1966, the Servant of God Paul VI saw the need to present fasting within the call of every Christian to "no longer live for himself, but for Him who loves him and gave himself for him … he will also have to live for his brethren" (cf. Ch. I). Lent could be a propitious time to present again the norms contained in the Apostolic Constitution, so that the authentic and perennial significance of this long held practice may be rediscovered, and thus assist us to mortify our egoism and open our heart to love of God and neighbor, the first and greatest Commandment of the new Law and compendium of the entire Gospel (cf. Mt 22, 34-40).

The faithful practice of fasting contributes, moreover, to conferring unity to the whole person, body and soul, helping to avoid sin and grow in intimacy with the Lord. Saint Augustine, who knew all too well his own negative impulses, defining them as "twisted and tangled knottiness" (Confessions, II, 10.18), writes: "I will certainly impose privation, but it is so that he will forgive me, to be pleasing in his eyes, that I may enjoy his delightfulness" (Sermo 400, 3, 3: PL 40, 708). Denying material food, which nourishes our body, nurtures an interior disposition to listen to Christ and be fed by His saving word. Through fasting and praying, we allow Him to come and satisfy the deepest hunger that we experience in the depths of our being: the hunger and thirst for God.

At the same time, fasting is an aid to open our eyes to the situation in which so many of our brothers and sisters live. In his First Letter, Saint John admonishes: "If anyone has the world’s goods, and sees his brother in need, yet shuts up his bowels of compassion from him – how does the love of God abide in him?" (3,17). Voluntary fasting enables us to grow in the spirit of the Good Samaritan, who bends low and goes to the help of his suffering brother (cf. Encyclical Deus caritas est, 15). By freely embracing an act of self-denial for the sake of another, we make a statement that our brother or sister in need is not a stranger. It is precisely to keep alive this welcoming and attentive attitude towards our brothers and sisters that I encourage the parishes and every other community to intensify in Lent the custom of private and communal fasts, joined to the reading of the Word of God, prayer and almsgiving. From the beginning, this has been the hallmark of the Christian community, in which special collections were taken up (cf. 2 Cor 8-9; Rm 15, 25-27), the faithful being invited to give to the poor what had been set aside from their fast (Didascalia Ap., V, 20,18). This practice needs to be rediscovered and encouraged again in our day, especially during the liturgical season of Lent.

What does this mean for our domestic churches? We need to do more than just abstain from meat on Fridays. We need to truly sacrifice. Shrimp scampi is not a sacrifice. What do you think would be a meaningful sacrificial meal? It should be something inexpensive and simple. Grilled cheese sandwiches with tomato soup works. Black bean soup made with vegetable stock is a good choice. In the summer I usually have a bumper crop of basil so I have frozen pesto sauce that I thaw out to serve on pasta during Lent. Think about portion control. We should not feel stuffed after our Friday abstinence. Feeling a little bit hungry offers us the opportunity for solidarity with those who eat meager meals by necessity rather than by choice. It is worthwhile to note the sacrifice and offer the financial savings of this meager meal to a charitable cause. I will write more on almsgiving soon.

Comments

Peter Brown said…
Maybe the phone lines for Pres. Obama's transition tema and the IRS investigative office got switched, so he's picking from the wrong list.

Peace,
--Peter

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